Talk by Author Nicholas Basbanes _ by The Library Company of Philadelphia and American Philosophical Society:

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Date: 
Wednesday, October 30, 2013 - 5:30pm - 7:30pm
Location: 
Benjamin Franklin Hall, 427 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19139
United States

Nicholas Andrew Basbanes has written a thoroughgoing chronicle about the stuff books are traditionally made of: paper. He starts with its invention in China 1800 years ago, considers its use for everything from currency to the blueprints that facilitated the Industrial Revolution, and records a visit to the National Security Agency, where 100 million secret documents have been pulped and recycled as pizza boxes.

Basbanes graduated from Bates College and received a master of arts degree from Pennsylvania State University. He received his master’s degree in journalism in 1969 while serving aboard the aircraft carrier USS Oriskany during the first of two combat deployments he made to Yankee Station in the Gulf of Tonkin, off the coast of Vietnam. His first book, A Gentle Madness: Bibliophiles, Bibliomanes, and the Eternal Passion for Books, was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award in non-fiction for 1995, and was named a New York Times notable book of the year. He was commissioned by Yale University Press to write a centennial history of the Press, A World of Letters.

In addition to his books, Basbanes has written for numerous newspapers, magazines, and journals. He writes the “Gently Mad” column for Fine Books & Collections magazine, and lectures widely on book-related subjects. Book lovers relish meeting people who share their passion, just as all aficionados gravitate toward their own kind. So when Nicholas Basbanes, the king of bibliophiles, speaks here...there's sure to be a like-minded crowd on hand to absorb his every word.

 

Free
Open to Public
Registration required at www.amphilsoc.org

Categories
Event Type: 
Arts & Culture
Event Type: 
Educational Events
Event Type: 
GlobalPhilly™2013
Topic: 
GlobalPhilly™ 2013
Topic: 
Arts and Culture
Topic: 
Literature